De-Coder’s Ring

Consumable Security and Technology

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Flexing those Writing Muscles

An interesting thing happened to me this week.  I got asked to begin blogging publicly for my employer.  What??

About a year ago, I decided to start blogging regularly.  I’d blog here at fauie.com, I’d blog on LinkedIn and try to maintain myself on Twitter.

About 10 months ago, I got asked to build a video course on Neo4J, a NoSQL/graph database.

Before that decision a year ago, I was petrified of speaking or writing publicly.

“But Chris, you’re super smart, and funny and all the folks like you!” – said no one

Even if they did say that, it doesn’t matter.  The level of self-doubt that I held was paralyzing.   I knew I could code, I knew I could design big integrated solutions of software, but man, writing? Not my thing.

I was always afraid of not being the ‘best’.  I was always comparing myself to the smart people I know.  I was worried that people might not read what I put out there…   Imposter syndrome is an amazingly hindering affliction.   It’s real.

I’m not sure if it was just the right time, or my maturity or just realization that it didn’t matter if I was the best, but I started writing, and I’m really enjoying it!   Some people read my blog, some people listen to my podcasts, but you know what?  I’m having a blast doing it.

I’m not the smartest.

I’m not the most eloquent.

I don’t use the biggest of words.

…. but that’s OK.  I am me, I know what I know, and I have the experiences that I have, which no one in the world can duplicate.

STAGE FRIGHT!

I realized it was stage fright.  Essentially, fear of the unknown, fear of failure, really – fear of fear.

Once I started creating, I can’t stop.   It’s kind of all I think about.  I have so many blog post ideas, so many podcasts planned, and I’m SUPER excited about it…

bring it on!

Podcast feed: https://fauie.com/podcast

 

Routing Messages through Kafka

I’m going through a major project with a client in regards to migrating to a Kafka based streaming message platform.  This is a heckuva lot of fun.   Previously, I’ve written about how Kafka made the message bus dumb, on purpose:   find it here. 

Building out a  new streaming platform is an interesting challenge.  There are so many ways to handle the logic.  I’ll provide more details as time goes on, but there are at least three ways of dealing with a stream of data.

The Hard Wired Bus

A message bus needs various publishers and subscribers.  You can very tightly couple each service by having them be aware of what’s upstream or what’s downstream.  Upstream is where the message came from, downstream is where it goes next.  When each component is aware of the route a message must take, it becomes brittle and hard to change over time.  Imagine spaghetti.

The Smart Conductor

A conductor travels on the train.  The conductor determines the best route while moving along the train tracks.  The conductor can handle every message, after every service to determine which service is next in line.  This cleans up the function of each service along the line but makes the conductor pretty brittle too.  The more complex the system gets, the more complex the conductor gets.  A rules engine would be a great component to add to the conductor if you choose this path.

The Map Maker

A map maker plots a route for a hiker to follow.  In our case, the map maker is a component that sits at the very beginning of every stream.  When the event comes to the map makers topic (in Kafka), the map maker determines the best route for the message to take.  Using metadata or embedded data in the event, the map maker can send the route down the chain with the event itself.  Each service can use a common library to read from its configured topic, allow the custom service to do some work, and then use the wrapper again to pass the message downstream.  The biggest advantage here is that each service doesn’t care where the message comes from, or where it goes next.   This works great for streams that are static, and the route can be determined up front.    If there are decisions down stream, then it may need a ‘switch’ service that is allowed to update the route.

What’s the best path for your application?    Have something better that I haven’t thought of yet?

 

 

 

 

 

Podcast – John Lockie on Tech (part 2)

This week is another great interview with John Lockie.. well, really, it’s a continuation of last week’s that you can find here:  Podcast – John Lockie Interview (part one)

John goes straight to some solutions for networks (capture all the things) as well as credential monitoring (“they pop shell ridiculously easy”).

Listen to the knowledge!

Walking on Water Referral

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I had a college professor, Dr David Bernstein, once talk about recommendations and referrals. The line he said has stuck with me for near 20 years since I heard it:

“Don’t give a reference for someone if you can’t, by all good faith, make them sound like they walk on water.” – Dr David Bernstein

Over the past 20 years of my career, I’ve had dozens, if not hundreds of people ask me for a recommendation. Whether they’re going for a new job, a security clearance or some sort of promotion, it’s the first thing they need to iron out. They need solid references so there is more trust built around their case.

This seems to make a lot of sense, but, it’s really hard to tell someone no. You can wuss out and say “oh, my company policy won’t allow me to provide a referral”. Ok, that really may be the case, but, your integrity is important. Sometimes, we need to tell people the truth in order to help them grow.

If you have to say no, let them know why. No need to be mean, but be constructive. If they push you for “why” you can’t give a recommendation, talk to them about specific incidents or habits that they could improve upon.

If they have done something in the past to break your trust, and they still ask you, then you can laugh at them. That’s a no go. Protect your integrity at all costs.

Finding Solid Information

Ever find an eye-opening new source of information? Not technical information, like javadocs (are they still a thing?), but personal growth information.

in the old days, we had technical sources like slashdot, freshmeat, digg  etc.. but, times have gone on, and now we have other places we can read regularly to keep up… here are some links and reasons why I love them:

Web Sites
https://www.reddit.com/r/programming/ – Lots of technical stuff.  New, updated code, procedures, standards, etc.

www.reddit.com/r/startups – I have a great deal of passion around new companies and people getting up, killing it and dragging it home.

https://techcrunch.com/ – Tech Crunch is great for big industry news, and a nice place to find information on up and comers

https://news.ycombinator.com/ – Hacker News – Great place for anything tech related, up and coming

Podcasts

Civics 101 – Not tech, but, crazy informative and a must listen for any US citizen and anyone who wants to learn how the US works.

http://www.npr.org/podcasts/512508710/civics-101

Science Friday – Cause, Science

https://www.sciencefriday.com/listen/

Source Code Podcast – This is new for me, and fantastic:

Podcast

 

What am I missing out on?!

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